Did JPMorgan Chase Just Start A Digital Advertising Revolution?

By adageeditor@adage.com (George Slefo)


JPMorgan Chase had a bold idea: Spurred by word that one of its ads had appeared on a website called Jail 4 Hillary, it would slash the number of sites where it advertises to 5,000 from some 400,000. To its surprise, the early going has brought no significant hit to effectiveness and no hike in prices.

Its experiment, first reported Thursday by the New York Times, intensifies the spotlight on what many marketers consider a defective system for buying and selling digital advertising. Procter & Gamble, the world’s biggest advertiser, has been threatening to stop spending money with ad tech firms and publishers that don’t live up to its standards. Marketers are in revolt against YouTube after finding out that their ads were underwriting offensive video.

Now the experience of JPMorgan Chase suggests that advertisers can find consumers at a good price even without using ad tech to pull together the farthest, and sometimes least known, reaches of the web.

JPMorgan Chase had a bold idea: Spurred by word that one of its ads had appeared on a website called Jail 4 Hillary, it would slash the number of sites where it advertises to 5,000 from some 400,000. To its surprise, the early going has brought no significant hit to effectiveness and no hike in prices.

Its experiment, first reported Thursday by the New York Times, intensifies the spotlight on what many marketers consider a defective system for buying and selling digital advertising. Procter & Gamble, the world’s biggest advertiser, has been threatening to stop spending money with ad tech firms and publishers that don’t live up to its standards. Marketers are in revolt against YouTube after finding out that their ads were underwriting offensive video.

Now the experience of JPMorgan Chase suggests that advertisers can find consumers at a good price even without using ad tech to pull together the farthest, and sometimes least known, reaches of the web.

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Source:: Advertising Age – Digital